What's happening in Phase 2 of public engagement?

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The ten municipalities in the Calgary Metro Region are working together to develop a long-term plan for managed, sustainable growth in the region. Between July 24 and September 4, 2020, the Calgary Metropolitan Region Board (CMRB) asked members of the public to help identify common values from residents across the region to better understand the common benefit that regional planning can provide.

Over 3000 people visited this website to learn about the process and we received nearly 1600 contributions that were used to help shape the proposed approach to manage growth in the Calgary Metro Region as we plan for the next million residents.

Now we’re asking you to take some time to learn more about what’s being proposed and tell us how your community and way of life might be affected, for better or for worse. Visit the Discussion Forums to share your thoughts about what the proposed approach might mean for you and your community.

Leading regional planning expert Peter Calthorpe and the team at HDR|Calthorpe are recommending the proposed approach, which applies a core belief that successful places – whether neighbourhoods, counties, towns, urban districts, rural districts or metropolitan regions – must be diverse in uses and users, must be scaled to the pedestrian and human interaction, and must be environmentally sustainable.

What’s being proposed for the Calgary Metro Region is to manage growth differently than we have experienced in the past. Through higher density, more redevelopment, shared servicing, a greater mix of place types and collaboratively planning for “transit ready” development along future transit corridors, we hope to reduce land consumption, save money, and realize the benefits associated with regional planning.

HOW YOU CAN GET INVOLVED

Click here to watch the recording of our November 17 virtual open house.

Take the Survey to tell us what we need to keep in mind in planning how we might implement what’s being proposed.

The proposed approach has three key characteristics: Place Type Allocation, Transit-Ready Corridors, and Joint Planning Areas. Check out the FAQs to learn more about what’s being proposed, how the proposed approach was developed, including how public input helped shape the proposal.

Please click on the tabs below to tell us where you’re from (Guestbook), how you and your community might be affected (Discussion Forum), and what we need to keep in mind for putting the proposed approach into action (Survey).

The ten municipalities in the Calgary Metro Region are working together to develop a long-term plan for managed, sustainable growth in the region. Between July 24 and September 4, 2020, the Calgary Metropolitan Region Board (CMRB) asked members of the public to help identify common values from residents across the region to better understand the common benefit that regional planning can provide.

Over 3000 people visited this website to learn about the process and we received nearly 1600 contributions that were used to help shape the proposed approach to manage growth in the Calgary Metro Region as we plan for the next million residents.

Now we’re asking you to take some time to learn more about what’s being proposed and tell us how your community and way of life might be affected, for better or for worse. Visit the Discussion Forums to share your thoughts about what the proposed approach might mean for you and your community.

Leading regional planning expert Peter Calthorpe and the team at HDR|Calthorpe are recommending the proposed approach, which applies a core belief that successful places – whether neighbourhoods, counties, towns, urban districts, rural districts or metropolitan regions – must be diverse in uses and users, must be scaled to the pedestrian and human interaction, and must be environmentally sustainable.

What’s being proposed for the Calgary Metro Region is to manage growth differently than we have experienced in the past. Through higher density, more redevelopment, shared servicing, a greater mix of place types and collaboratively planning for “transit ready” development along future transit corridors, we hope to reduce land consumption, save money, and realize the benefits associated with regional planning.

HOW YOU CAN GET INVOLVED

Click here to watch the recording of our November 17 virtual open house.

Take the Survey to tell us what we need to keep in mind in planning how we might implement what’s being proposed.

The proposed approach has three key characteristics: Place Type Allocation, Transit-Ready Corridors, and Joint Planning Areas. Check out the FAQs to learn more about what’s being proposed, how the proposed approach was developed, including how public input helped shape the proposal.

Please click on the tabs below to tell us where you’re from (Guestbook), how you and your community might be affected (Discussion Forum), and what we need to keep in mind for putting the proposed approach into action (Survey).

Discussions: All (10) Open (0)
  • More Masterplanned Community “Place Types”

    3 months ago
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    The proposed approach for growth in the Calgary Metro Region is based on a mix of six different “place types”. Each “place type” reflects a variety of buildings, streets, and amenities, and represents a different type of development with different levels of density for residential and employment use. 

    The Masterplanned Community is like Panorama Hills in Calgary (check out the pictures below for a visual of this) or Harmony in Rocky View County. The masterplanned community “place type” is characterized by its comprehensive and integrated approach to land use. This “place type” is often designed so residents have retail, commercial, civic, and recreational amenities conveniently located within a short walk of their homes. It is generally designed to emphasize sustainability, community, and convenience to live, work, shop, and play within the masterplanned community. The average density is 10 dwelling units per acre and 5 employees per acre.

    Masterplanned communities are not typically seen in rural areas, though have recently become the most common form of suburban development in the Region. 

    The proposed approach for managing growth in the Calgary Metro Region would see more Masterplanned-type development happening in all municipalities. In rural parts of the Region, these “place types” are proposed specifically within and around Joint Planning Areas that are likely to become more urban as our population grows. In the first phase of public engagement, we heard that community members would like to see less sprawl and more infill/redevelopment. Encouraging more Masterplanned-type developments across the Region will help meet this interest.

    Based on your thoughts and experiences in the Calgary Metro Region, what do you see as the benefits and drawbacks of Masterplanned-type development? 

    If more of this type of development came to your community, how do you think your way of life might be affected, for better or worse?

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  • Fewer Residential Subdivision “Place Types”

    3 months ago
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    The proposed approach for growth in the Calgary Metro Region is based on a mix of six different “place types”. Each “place type” reflects a variety of buildings, streets, and amenities, and represents a different type of development with different levels of density for residential and employment use. 

    The Residential Subdivision “place type” is like Langdon, or Big Springs in Airdrie (check out the pictures below for a visual of this). This “place type” category represents areas that are predominantly residential and mostly in suburban locations often on the urban edge. Single family homes are the dominant housing type with other housing types often included. This “place type” is generally automobile oriented as the development pattern allows few shopping, employment, and open space destinations to be conveniently made via walking or biking. The average density is 5 dwelling units per acre. 

    The proposed approach for managing growth in the Calgary Metro Region would see  less Residential Subdivision-type development across the Region. We heard in the first phase of public engagement that community members generally would like to see less focus on traditional single use residential development that encourages sprawl. Having less Residential Subdivision-type development will help meet this interest.

    Based on your thoughts and experiences in the Calgary Metro Region, what do you see as the benefits and drawbacks of Residential Subdivision-type development? If there was less of this type of development in your community, how do you think your way of life might be affected, for better or worse?

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  • A Shift in Country Residential “Place Types”

    3 months ago
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    The proposed approach for growth in the Calgary Metro Region is based on a mix of six different “place types”. Each “place type” reflects a variety of buildings, streets, and amenities, and represents a different type of development with different levels of density for residential and employment use. 

    The traditional Country Residential “place type” is like Springbank in Rocky View County (check out the pictures below for a visual of this). This “place type” is characterized by its larger lot sizes, low density, and single-family detached housing type. This “place type” is located in rural areas. The average density is less than 5 dwelling units per acre.

    The proposed approach for managing growth in the Calgary Metro Region would see less traditional Country Residential-type development happening in all parts of the Region. Rather, the proposed approach would encourage more diverse forms of residential development, such as cluster development, infill or rural hubs. 

    Country cluster developments typically have communal services while retaining open space between clusters of houses. Country Residential infill offers a more efficient use of land in a rural context. Rural hubs concentrate development in a way that supports rural lifestyles and economies (like some hamlets). The specific type of development that would be concentrated in a hub (i.e. commercial, industrial, and/or residential) would be left up to municipalities to determine based on the unique needs and interests of their communities.  

    We heard in the first phase of public engagement that community members value maintaining a rural way of life while having good access to services and amenities, and maintaining diversity of choice. Shifting the focus from acreage-type development toward more country cluster developments and rural hubs (concentrated development) seeks to maintain the rural character of the region while accommodating growth in a more compact form.

    Based on your thoughts and experiences in the Calgary Metro Region, what do you see as the benefits and drawbacks of shifting Country Residential-type development from traditional acreages towards more country cluster or rural hub developments? 

    If this shift in approach to development happened in your community, how do you think your way of life might be affected, for better or worse?

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  • Fewer Office Commercial “Place Types”

    3 months ago
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    The proposed approach for growth in the Calgary Metro Region is based on a mix of six different “place types”. Each “place type” reflects a variety of buildings, streets, and amenities, and represents a different type of development with different levels of density for residential and employment use. 

    The Office Commercial “place type” is like Midpark/Midnapore in Calgary (check out the pictures below for a visual of this). This “place type” is characterized as an area with stand-alone office buildings. This “place type” is typically separated from adjacent uses although it can be located next to residential areas. This “place type” is an employment centre with supporting uses for workers such as food and business retail uses. There are no residential land uses in this “place type”. The average density is 20 employees per acre.

    The proposed approach for managing growth in the Calgary Metro Region would see less focus on traditional standalone Office Commercial development, with the intent of moving these types of jobs more into Masterplanned, rural hubs, country cluster and City and Town Centre or Transit-Oriented-type developments that include a mix of both commercial and residential properties. We heard in the first phase of public engagement that community members want to see land used more efficiently to minimize land consumption. Having less standalone Office Commercial and more mixed use development will help meet this interest.

    Based on your thoughts and experiences in the Calgary Metro Region, what do you see as the benefits and drawbacks of Office Commercial-type development? 

    If there was less of this type of development in your community, how do you think your way of life might be affected, for better or worse?

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  • More City and Town Centre or Transit-Oriented Development (TOD) “Place Types”

    3 months ago
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    The proposed approach for growth in the Calgary Metro Region is based on a mix of six different “place types”. Each “place type” reflects a variety of buildings, streets, and amenities, and represents a different type of development with different levels of density for residential and employment use. 

    The City and Town Centre or Transit-Oriented Development (TOD) “place type” is like Marda Loop in Calgary (check out the pictures below for a visual of this). This “place type” is characterized by medium-density mixed use development with many day-to-day services within walking distance. These areas have a variety of housing types, employment types, and retail land uses within them. New growth in these areas create value while minimizing associated congestion, environmental, and infrastructure impacts. They are designed to create a sense of place and encourage a vibrant pedestrian environment. The average density is 20 dwelling units per acre and 15 employees per acre.

    City and Town Centre or Transit-Oriented Development (TOD) “place types” are not currently seen in rural parts of the Calgary Metro Region.

    The proposed approach for managing growth in the Calgary Metro Region would see more City and Town Centre/TOD-type development happening in all Towns & Cities in the Region. This type of development is a key part of the proposed approach that encourages transit-ready corridors between Towns & Cities in the Region, as well as in parts of Rocky View County. This type of development is not being proposed for Wheatland or Foothills County.

    We heard in the first phase of public engagement that community members wanted to see more infill/redevelopment, but weren’t generally interested in high rise towers to achieve this. Encouraging more City and Town Centre/TOD-type developments that are a few stories high with both residential and commercial use helps to meet this interest.

    Based on your thoughts and experiences in the Calgary Metro Region, what do you see as the benefits and drawbacks of City and Town Centre/TOD-type development? 

    If more of this type of development came to your community, how do you think your way of life might be affected, for better or worse?

    Replies Closed
  • Maintain Industrial “Place Types”

    3 months ago
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    The proposed approach for growth in the Calgary Metro Region is based on a mix of six different “place types”. Each “place type” reflects a variety of buildings, streets, and amenities, and represents a different type of development with different levels of density for residential and employment use. 

    The Industrial “place type” is like East Lake in Airdrie (check out the pictures below for a visual of this). This “place type” is characterized by a variety of non-residential, industrial, and commercial land uses. This “place type” includes warehousing and manufacturing uses. There are no residential land uses in this “place type”. The average density is 10 employees per acre.

    The proposed approach for managing growth in the Calgary Metro Region would see Industrial-type development similar as to what’s been done traditionally to support and grow jobs in the Region. We heard in the first phase of public engagement that economic development should be part of any regional growth plan. Continuing to have Industrial-type development across the Region will help meet this interest.

    Based on your thoughts and experiences in the Calgary Metro Region, what do you see as the benefits and drawbacks of Industrial-type development? 

    If this type of development continues in a similar way as it is today in your community, how do you think your way of life might be affected, for better or worse?

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  • What if we didn't do anything differently?

    6 months ago
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    Scenario 1 shows how growth would happen if today’s mix of land uses and densities continue, and there is no major expansion of transit in the region. It is the baseline from which other scenarios were considered. 

    We believe that the Calgary Metro Region is a great place to live, work, and play. We also see opportunities to work together as municipalities to build on our common values and proactively plan for when the next million residents come to this great region.

    Thinking about how you live, work, and play in the Calgary Metro Region, what qualities do you think are most important to keep as we plan for growth in the future?

    When you think about how the Calgary Metro Region has grown and is growing today, what do you see as the greatest benefits of that approach to growth?

    What concerns or worries do you have about continuing to approach growth the way we always have in the Calgary Metro Region?

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  • What do you consider to be sustainable growth in the Calgary Metro Region?

    6 months ago
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    Planning for the next million residents means that we need to make choices about what sustainable growth looks and feels like for the Calgary Metro Region. That means we’re thinking about the effects of our choices on the environment, the economy, and the people who make up our diverse communities.

    Scenario 1 reflects what might happen if we keep doing what we've been doing in the way we approach growth. Scenarios 2 and 3 reflect different ways that the Calgary Metro Region might take a higher density approach to growth. 

    If we choose to approach growth differently than we have in the past, our region could see the following effects as the next million residents join us:

    • 45% less land developed
    • 25% lower carbon emissions
    • 17% less water use
    • 19% fewer vehicle kilometers travelled (VKT)
    • 62% more people with access to transit within one mile of their homes

    Click here to view some graphs and maps showing comparisons between continuing to grow as we have (Scenario 1) and planning for significant infill (Scenario 2) and/or concentrating growth around expanded transit networks (Scenario 3).

    When you think about the next million residents coming to the Calgary Metro Region, what effects matter most to you? 

    What do you see as the greatest benefits and drawbacks of higher density development (as shown in Scenarios 2 and 3)?


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  • Where will people live and work?

    6 months ago
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    The maps below show the distribution of where people might live when the next million residents are in the Calgary Metro Region.


    Scenario 1 shows how growth would happen if today’s mix of land uses and densities continue, and there is no major expansion of transit in the region. 

    Scenario 2 shows how growth would happen if much more of our future growth is infill development, creating higher density development, particularly in urban centres like Calgary.

    Scenario 3 shows how growth could happen in higher density clusters around future transit stations and city or town centres. This scenario would require major regional transit extensions (bus rapid transit or light rail transit) to Airdrie, Chestermere, Cochrane and Rocky View County. 

    When you think about the Calgary Metro Region growing to include a million more residents, what kind of development would you like to see take place to support that growth? 

    Where would you like to see an increase in jobs and housing?

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  • How would expanded transit affect you and your community?

    6 months ago
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    Scenario 3 shows how growth could happen in higher density clusters around future transit stations and city or town centres. This scenario would require major regional transit extensions (bus rapid transit or light rail transit) to Airdrie, Chestermere, Cochrane and Rocky View County, requiring collaboration by those municipalities.

    The choices reflected in Scenario 3 are about spreading higher density development out across expanded transit networks in the region.

    Thinking about where you live and work, and how you get around, what would it mean for you and your community if these transit expansions were in place today? 

    What excites and/or worries you about potential transit expansions to support growth in the Calgary Metro Region?

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