Thank you for your input!

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Phase 3 of public engagement on the Calgary Metro Region's draft regional growth plan is now over. Thank you to the nearly 3,000 people who visited this site between March 18 and April 8 to learn more and share your thoughts.



A "What We Heard Report" for this most recent phase on engagement will be shared in May. We'll also be sharing the Regional Growth Plan on this site once it is finalized, by June 1. Subscribe for updates at the top right of this page to receive a link to these documents when they are ready.


In the meantime, you are welcome to learn more by downloading the draft plan and checking out the FAQs. Click here to download a higher resolution version of the Regional Growth Structure map.


If you missed our open houses, you can watch the recordings to learn more, and check out the responses to the questions received during the March 30 session. You might also be interested in reading the "What We Heard Report" for a summary of the Phase 2 engagement process that took place last November, and click here to access the report from Phase 1.


In the spirit of reconciliation, we acknowledge that we live, work and play on the traditional territories of the Blackfoot Confederacy (Siksika, Kainai, Piikani), the Tsuut’ina, the Stoney Nakoda Nations (Chiniki, Wesley, Bearspaw), the Métis Nation of Alberta (Region 3), and all people who make their homes in the Treaty 7 region of Southern Alberta.

Phase 3 of public engagement on the Calgary Metro Region's draft regional growth plan is now over. Thank you to the nearly 3,000 people who visited this site between March 18 and April 8 to learn more and share your thoughts.



A "What We Heard Report" for this most recent phase on engagement will be shared in May. We'll also be sharing the Regional Growth Plan on this site once it is finalized, by June 1. Subscribe for updates at the top right of this page to receive a link to these documents when they are ready.


In the meantime, you are welcome to learn more by downloading the draft plan and checking out the FAQs. Click here to download a higher resolution version of the Regional Growth Structure map.


If you missed our open houses, you can watch the recordings to learn more, and check out the responses to the questions received during the March 30 session. You might also be interested in reading the "What We Heard Report" for a summary of the Phase 2 engagement process that took place last November, and click here to access the report from Phase 1.


In the spirit of reconciliation, we acknowledge that we live, work and play on the traditional territories of the Blackfoot Confederacy (Siksika, Kainai, Piikani), the Tsuut’ina, the Stoney Nakoda Nations (Chiniki, Wesley, Bearspaw), the Métis Nation of Alberta (Region 3), and all people who make their homes in the Treaty 7 region of Southern Alberta.

Discussions: All (16) Open (0)
  • Rural municipalities

    about 2 months ago
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    CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

    If you live, work or play in a rural municipality, we’d like to know how you think the draft Regional Growth Plan will affect you and your community in positive and negative ways.


    Please take some time to review the draft plan and check out the FAQs, particularly the parts that talk about implications of the plan on rural areas.


    What do you see as the potential benefits and drawbacks of the draft plan for your community and the broader Calgary Metro Region?

    Replies Closed
  • Hamlets, towns, and cities

    about 2 months ago
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    CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

    If you live, work or play in a hamlet, town or city in the Calgary Metro Region that’s not the City of Calgary, we’d like to know how you think the draft Regional Growth Plan will affect you and your community in positive and negative ways. 

    For folks in Airdrie, Bragg Creek, Cheadle, Chestermere, Cochrane, Conrich, Harmony, High River, Langdon, Millarville, Okotoks, Priddis, and Strathmore, we’re talking to you.

    Please take some time to review the draft plan and check out the FAQs, particularly the parts that talk about Preferred Placetypes and Preferred Growth Areas.

    What do you see as the potential benefits and drawbacks of the draft plan for your community and the broader Calgary Metro Region?

    Replies Closed
  • City of Calgary

    about 2 months ago
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    CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

    If you live, work or play in the City of Calgary, we’d like to know how you think the draft Regional Growth Plan will affect you and your community in positive and negative ways.

    Please take some time to review the draft plan and check out the FAQs, particularly the parts that talk about Preferred Placetypes and Preferred Growth Areas.

    What do you see as the potential benefits and drawbacks of the draft plan for your community and the broader Calgary Metro Region?

    Replies Closed
  • Business Community

    about 2 months ago
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    CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

    If you have an interest in the Business Community in the Calgary Metro Region, we’d like to know how you think the draft Regional Growth Plan will affect you, economic development, and all communities in the region.

    Please take some time to review the draft plan and check out the FAQs, particularly the parts that talk about Preferred Placetypes and Preferred Growth Areas, as well as economic wellbeing.

    What do you see as the potential benefits and drawbacks of the draft plan for the business community in particular, and for the broader Calgary Metro Region?

    Replies Closed
  • Environmental Sustainability

    about 2 months ago
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    CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

    If you have an interest in the environmental sustainability of the Calgary Metro Region, we’d like to know how you think the draft Regional Growth Plan will affect you, environmental sustainability, and all communities in the region.

    Please take some time to review the draft plan and check out the FAQs, particularly the parts that talk about Preferred Placetypes and Preferred Growth Areas, as well as how the plan addresses environmentally responsible land use.

    What do you see as the potential benefits and drawbacks of the draft plan for environmental sustainability in particular, and for the broader Calgary Metro Region?

    Replies Closed
  • Community-serving organizations

    about 2 months ago
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    CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

    If you are part of the Not-for-Profit (Social Sector) Community in the Calgary Metro Region, we’d like to know how you think the draft Regional Growth Plan will affect you, the groups you serve, and all communities in the region.

    Please take some time to review the draft plan and check out the FAQs, particularly the parts that talk about Preferred Placetypes and Preferred Growth Areas.

    What do you see as the potential benefits and drawbacks of the draft plan for the communities you serve in particular, and for the broader Calgary Metro Region?

    Replies Closed
  • More Masterplanned Community “Place Types”

    6 months ago
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    CLOSED: Thank you for sharing your thoughts. This discussion has concluded.

    The proposed approach for growth in the Calgary Metro Region is based on a mix of six different “place types”. Each “place type” reflects a variety of buildings, streets, and amenities, and represents a different type of development with different levels of density for residential and employment use. 

    The Masterplanned Community is like Panorama Hills in Calgary (check out the pictures below for a visual of this) or Harmony in Rocky View County. The masterplanned community “place type” is characterized by its comprehensive and integrated approach to land use. This “place type” is often designed so residents have retail, commercial, civic, and recreational amenities conveniently located within a short walk of their homes. It is generally designed to emphasize sustainability, community, and convenience to live, work, shop, and play within the masterplanned community. The average density is 10 dwelling units per acre and 5 employees per acre.

    Masterplanned communities are not typically seen in rural areas, though have recently become the most common form of suburban development in the Region. 

    The proposed approach for managing growth in the Calgary Metro Region would see more Masterplanned-type development happening in all municipalities. In rural parts of the Region, these “place types” are proposed specifically within and around Joint Planning Areas that are likely to become more urban as our population grows. In the first phase of public engagement, we heard that community members would like to see less sprawl and more infill/redevelopment. Encouraging more Masterplanned-type developments across the Region will help meet this interest.

    Based on your thoughts and experiences in the Calgary Metro Region, what do you see as the benefits and drawbacks of Masterplanned-type development? 

    If more of this type of development came to your community, how do you think your way of life might be affected, for better or worse?

    Replies Closed
  • Fewer Residential Subdivision “Place Types”

    6 months ago
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    CLOSED: Thank you for sharing your thoughts. This discussion has concluded.

    The proposed approach for growth in the Calgary Metro Region is based on a mix of six different “place types”. Each “place type” reflects a variety of buildings, streets, and amenities, and represents a different type of development with different levels of density for residential and employment use. 

    The Residential Subdivision “place type” is like Langdon, or Big Springs in Airdrie (check out the pictures below for a visual of this). This “place type” category represents areas that are predominantly residential and mostly in suburban locations often on the urban edge. Single family homes are the dominant housing type with other housing types often included. This “place type” is generally automobile oriented as the development pattern allows few shopping, employment, and open space destinations to be conveniently made via walking or biking. The average density is 5 dwelling units per acre. 

    The proposed approach for managing growth in the Calgary Metro Region would see  less Residential Subdivision-type development across the Region. We heard in the first phase of public engagement that community members generally would like to see less focus on traditional single use residential development that encourages sprawl. Having less Residential Subdivision-type development will help meet this interest.

    Based on your thoughts and experiences in the Calgary Metro Region, what do you see as the benefits and drawbacks of Residential Subdivision-type development? If there was less of this type of development in your community, how do you think your way of life might be affected, for better or worse?

    Replies Closed
  • A Shift in Country Residential “Place Types”

    6 months ago
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    CLOSED: Thank you for sharing your thoughts. This discussion has concluded.

    The proposed approach for growth in the Calgary Metro Region is based on a mix of six different “place types”. Each “place type” reflects a variety of buildings, streets, and amenities, and represents a different type of development with different levels of density for residential and employment use. 

    The traditional Country Residential “place type” is like Springbank in Rocky View County (check out the pictures below for a visual of this). This “place type” is characterized by its larger lot sizes, low density, and single-family detached housing type. This “place type” is located in rural areas. The average density is less than 5 dwelling units per acre.

    The proposed approach for managing growth in the Calgary Metro Region would see less traditional Country Residential-type development happening in all parts of the Region. Rather, the proposed approach would encourage more diverse forms of residential development, such as cluster development, infill or rural hubs. 

    Country cluster developments typically have communal services while retaining open space between clusters of houses. Country Residential infill offers a more efficient use of land in a rural context. Rural hubs concentrate development in a way that supports rural lifestyles and economies (like some hamlets). The specific type of development that would be concentrated in a hub (i.e. commercial, industrial, and/or residential) would be left up to municipalities to determine based on the unique needs and interests of their communities.  

    We heard in the first phase of public engagement that community members value maintaining a rural way of life while having good access to services and amenities, and maintaining diversity of choice. Shifting the focus from acreage-type development toward more country cluster developments and rural hubs (concentrated development) seeks to maintain the rural character of the region while accommodating growth in a more compact form.

    Based on your thoughts and experiences in the Calgary Metro Region, what do you see as the benefits and drawbacks of shifting Country Residential-type development from traditional acreages towards more country cluster or rural hub developments? 

    If this shift in approach to development happened in your community, how do you think your way of life might be affected, for better or worse?

    Replies Closed
  • Fewer Office Commercial “Place Types”

    6 months ago
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    CLOSED: Thank you for sharing your thoughts. This discussion has concluded.

    The proposed approach for growth in the Calgary Metro Region is based on a mix of six different “place types”. Each “place type” reflects a variety of buildings, streets, and amenities, and represents a different type of development with different levels of density for residential and employment use. 

    The Office Commercial “place type” is like Midpark/Midnapore in Calgary (check out the pictures below for a visual of this). This “place type” is characterized as an area with stand-alone office buildings. This “place type” is typically separated from adjacent uses although it can be located next to residential areas. This “place type” is an employment centre with supporting uses for workers such as food and business retail uses. There are no residential land uses in this “place type”. The average density is 20 employees per acre.

    The proposed approach for managing growth in the Calgary Metro Region would see less focus on traditional standalone Office Commercial development, with the intent of moving these types of jobs more into Masterplanned, rural hubs, country cluster and City and Town Centre or Transit-Oriented-type developments that include a mix of both commercial and residential properties. We heard in the first phase of public engagement that community members want to see land used more efficiently to minimize land consumption. Having less standalone Office Commercial and more mixed use development will help meet this interest.

    Based on your thoughts and experiences in the Calgary Metro Region, what do you see as the benefits and drawbacks of Office Commercial-type development? 

    If there was less of this type of development in your community, how do you think your way of life might be affected, for better or worse?

    Replies Closed